FDR’s Court-Packing Scheme Shortly after the 1936 election, FDR pitched his popularity against the Supreme Court, which had already nullified

FDR’s Court-Packing Scheme

Shortly after the 1936 election, FDR pitched his popularity against the Supreme Court, which had already nullified important New Deal legislation including the Agricultural Adjustment Act (1933) and the National Industrial Recovery Act (1933) and was turning its attention to the Wagner Act (1935) and the Social Security Act (1935). Without consulting Congressional leaders or his own advisors, FDR devised a scheme to increase the number of Supreme Court justices from 9 to 15, adding six additional justices to the “overburdened” court. His opponents and many of his friends saw through the transparent attempt to gain control of that third branch of government, and the “court-packing scheme,” as it became known, cost him dearly in political capital.

Exercise #16 

  1.  According to the political cartoon above, who do the babies represent and which four groups were particularly opposed to the proposal?

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