Men when they enter into society, yield up a part of their natural liberty, for the sake of being protected by government. If they yield up all their natural rights they are absolute slaves to their g

Men when they enter into society, yield up a part of their natural liberty, for the sake of being protected by government. If they yield up all their natural rights they are absolute slaves to their governors. If they yield up less than is necessary, the government is so feeble, that it cannot protect them. To yield up so much, as is necessary for the purposes of government; and to retain all beyond what is necessary, is the great point, which ought, if possible, to be attained in the formation of a constitution. . . . To define what portion of his natural liberty, the subject shall at the time be entitled to retain, is one great end of a bill of rights. . . . Without such a bill of rights, firmly securing the privileges of the subject, the government is always in danger of degenerating into tyranny.1

What important Anti-Federalist idea is expressed in this excerpt from the Anti-Federalist Papers?

A. Opposition to the presidency

B. Belief in a strong central government

C. Fear of tyranny

D. Concern over taxation

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